Book Review|| One for Sorrow by Mary Downing Hahn

Book Review|| One for Sorrow by Mary Downing Hahn

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One for Sorrow
by Mary Downing Hahn

304 pages
Published July 18th, 2017 by Clarion Books
ARC, NetGalley
Paranormal, Ghosts, Historical Fiction, Tweens

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Against the ominous backdrop of the influenza epidemic of 1918, Annie, a new girl at school, is claimed as best friend by Elsie, a classmate who is a tattletale, a liar, and a thief. Soon Annie makes other friends and finds herself joining them in teasing and tormenting Elsie. Elsie dies from influenza, but then she returns to reclaim Annie’s friendship and punish all the girls who bullied her. Young readers who revel in spooky stories will relish this chilling tale of a girl haunted by a vengeful ghost.
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*I received this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you!*
plot
The story is mostly about Annie and Elsie. Elsie comes back from the dead and starts tormenting Annie and the girls who wronged her. To say that nobody believes Annie about Elsie’s ghosts it’s an understatement. 
The novel is not scary in a gory, horror way. However, it does has a creepy feeling to it. I was involved with Annie’s situation; I couldn’t wait to see what happens to her and if she’ll be alright.
The book also has a historical subplot to it. It is set in 1918, right before the Great War ended. It touches subjects such as war politics, and how the German living in USA were ostracized and treated with malice. Moreover, the novel also describes vividly how the influenza epidemic affected people’s lives, and how it left behind it a lot of victims. As the author mentioned at the end of the book, some parts of the story are based on her mother’s experience with influenza, wakes, and funerals. Maybe that’s why it feels so realistic.
The plot itself it’s fast-paced and filled with action. There is no dull moment in this book, and it’s a very fast read! 
characters
Great and complex characterization! Each character has a unique personality,  a distinctive voice, and at least one major flaw. In other words, the characters are very realistic. They sound and act like real girls.
Having said that, the characters themselves are not very nice. Not even the heroine or the victim turned villain.  Oh, no.
Annie and her group of friends are bullies. They mock and terrorize Elsie most of the time. Even though Annie and Jane feel some remorse, the peer pressure it’s too strong.
However, Elsie is no angel either. She is mean, clingy, manipulative, and vindictive. 
If you like reading only about pleasant characters, this book it’s not for you – especially if you expect the main character to be relatable and good. Don’t get me wrong, Annie has good traits; after all, she is just a little girl. However, the way she thinks of Elsie it’s not very innocent.
Personally, I do not have a problem with the characters. I actually enjoyed the fact that the characters are not perfect or goody two shoes. A lot of children are like that – some grow out of it, some not.
final-thoughts
In short, One for Sorrow is a fast paced, entertaining novel. The characters are well developed, the setting and world building are intriguing, and the plot is unique.
I would’ve like to know a little bit more about Elsie; to know her background. Was her home life really that bad, or was she exaggerating? I’m confused because Elsie is not the most honest character.  
I wished the book was a little bit longer, mostly because I enjoyed it so much :D. 
recommand
Yes!!! Definitely! The book is a sure page turner, and it reads really fast. I think people who love reading about ghosts and creepy situations will definitely enjoy this novel! 
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lauraxo

Book Review| Monet – The Early Years by George T. M. Shackelford


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Monet – The Early Years
by George T. M. Shackelford

Art, Non-Fiction, History, Biography
320 pages
ARC, NetGalley

Published January 6th, 2017 by Yale University Press (first published November 2016)
⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

The first comprehensive examination of the painter’s formative years, tracing the evolution of Monet’s early style and personal ambitions that drove the rest of his career.

This elegant volume is the first to be devoted to the young genius of Claude Monet (1840–1926). Bringing together the greatest paintings from his early career—including his first Salon-exhibited work, the Kimbell Art Museum’s La Pointe de la Hève at Low Tide; Déjeuner sur l’Herbe (Luncheon on the Grass) and The Magpie from the Musée d’Orsay; and The Green Wave and La Grenouillère from the Metropolitan Museum of Art—it features essays by distinguished scholars, focusing on the evolution of Monet’s own distinctive mode of painting. Through the 1860s, the young painter absorbed and transformed a variety of influences, from the lessons of the Barbizon school and his mentor Boudin to the challenges posed by his friends Manet, Pissarro, Renoir, and Sisley. Artistic innovation and personal ambition shaped the work of the celebrated impressionist painter from the very start of his long and illustrious career.

George T. M. Shackelford is deputy director of the Kimbell Art Museum. Richard Shiff is Effie Marie Cain Regents Chair in Art at the University of Texas at Austin. Richard Thomson is Watson Gordon Professor of Fine Art, University of Edinburgh. Anthea Callen is professor emeritus of the Australian National University and professor emeritus of visual culture, University of Nottingham. Mary Dailey Desmarais is associate curator at the Museum of Fine Arts, Montreal.

 

This book is a great source of information for everyone who wants to know more about Monet and his life. Plus, you also get to see a lot of Monet’s paintings, since the book is filled with great pictures of Monet’s works.

It was a different experience for me to read this book. I mostly read fiction, and it’s different when you read a novel than when you read a history book about a real person – it took me longer than usual to finish this book. Nevertheless, it was a pleasure to read it, and I enjoyed it tremendously.

To be honest, I did not know much about Monet before I read this book. I’ve heard of him, of course, but did not know much about his life. This book, Monet- The Early Years by George T. M. Shackelford, sparked my interest in art history; therefore, this semester I took an Art History course as a gen. ed. in college. Moreover, for my big essay, I chose to write about Monet and Impressionism, because I became fascinated by this great artist that gave the name to a new art movement, thanks to his painting named Impressions: Sunrise.

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I am very grateful for the opportunity to read this book. It opened the door for a new interest.

I recommend Monet – Early Years by George T. M. Shackelford to everyone who loves art and Monet. Even if you don’t know much about art, I still think you should give this book a chance. Who knows, maybe you’ll develop a new passion. 🙂

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

bibliofagista